Agent Palmer

Of all things Geek. I am…

The Underappreciated Innovator: A Review of George Lucas: A Life by Brian Jay Jones

George Lucas A Life by Brian Jay Jones

Before I picked up George Lucas: A Life by Brian Jay Jones, I had seen most of his movies and presumed to know much of his story building an empire, making movies and innovations. And well, I was wrong. I knew very little, but I know more now, because the book is a fantastic read.

As biographies go, specifically unauthorized ones, this one may be one of the best, because it is so well researched that citations at the back of my hardcover copy merit 51 pages to list them all. Here’s the other thing, I didn’t know it was an unauthorized biography until I read the “Acknowledgements” at the end of the book. That’s how in depth and well written and thoroughly researched it is.

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‘Console Wars’ and How the Revolution was, in fact, Pixelated

Console Wars by Blake J Harris

Despite the fact that Console Wars by Blake J. Harris is about Sega rising to the top to dethrone Nintendo before slowly, painfully, and publicly falling out of consoles all together, this book is mainly about marketing, big ideas, and Tom Kalinske.

Now, I don’t mean that as a slight. Kalinske is a fascinating individual; the man came up with He-Man when he was at Mattel, after all. But the book does generally paint Nintendo as the bad guy despite the fact that Nintendo ultimately wins or at least won the 1990s.

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The ‘Elephant’ in the room: Michael Caine’s second autobiography adds depth to Hollywood heavyweight

The Elephant to Hollywood by Michael Caine

Sir Michael Caine has had an illustrious career in Hollywood. He’s won two Academy Awards, been an actor in over 160 films and television shows, and he’s the bestselling author of What’s it All About?, his first autobiography. And now he’s written a second autobiography, The Elephant to Hollywood.

Having read both of Caine’s autobiographies, I can say with certainty that there is something both regal and down to earth about the way he describes the stories of his life.

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The Jerusalem Syndrome: My Life As a Reluctant Messiah by Marc Maron is Fantastic

The Jerusalem Syndrome: My Life As a Reluctant Messiah by Marc Maron

I read and loved Attempting Normal, so much so, that I now own two copies. The paperback that I read and a hardcover copy signed by Marc Maron himself. But once I read that book, I realized that I wanted to read more from Marc, apparently listening twice weekly to WTF with Marc Maron just isn’t enough, so I picked up a copy of The Jerusalem Syndrome: My Life As a Reluctant Messiah and it did not disappoint.

Written back in 2001, the jokes, diatribes, and issues that Marc dealt with during the period of time predating this book’s publishing all appear to still hold validity to this day.

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