Agent Palmer

Of all things Geek. I am…

Genndy Tartakovsky’s “Primal” on Adult Swim is a brilliant and tragic piece of art

Genndy Tartakovsky Primal Cartoon Network Adult Swim

Genndy Tartakovsky’s Primal is beautiful in its diverse aspects of minimalism, the depth of the main characters, honest in its depictions of violence, with wondrously organic animation and well-directed no dialog communication. Simply put, all together, Primal is a work of art.

The show follows a caveman “Spear” and a Tyrannosaurus “Fang” brought together in the pilot episode by tragic circumstances…

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A Sonic Fury For The Senses: Sturgill Simpson’s Latest Badass Project “Sound & Fury”

Sound & Fury by Sturgill Simpson Album Cover

Sonically and visually Sturgill Simpson presents Sound & Fury, A Netflix Original Anime Film, connects on so many levels to so many things, it has already become an instant classic for me in every way!

With roots that appear in not just in anime, but in MTV’s Liquid Television and 1981’s Heavy Metal, the varying art styles within each vignette, and therefore the full spectacle overall, is visually breathtaking.

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Why the ThunderCats 2011 Reboot is Totally is Worth Your Time

Why the ThunderCats 2011 Reboot is Totally is Worth Your Time

If seeing the ads for the upcoming ThunderCats Roar has you feeling down… The 2011 reboot that you probably paid no attention to, might be for you. Ok, maybe it’s unfair to dismiss Roar without seeing an episode but many fans of the original are down on the new direction and style for the franchise. Some of them wondering “Where’s the badass version? I’m just not into this cute stuff.

“Well, sit back and let me tell ya about a version that’s more like “Game Of Thrones.”

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NBC’s made-for-TV adaptation of Tolkien’s The Hobbit has a comfortable hobbit-hole in my soul

The Hobbit 1977

It seems odd that NBC’s made-for-TV movie of The Hobbit, which first aired on November 27, 1977, should be so divisive among fans. It is, after all, not only a faithful adaptation of the book upon which it is based but it is also the first adaption to the screen, both large and small.

That’s right, 1977; 35 years before Peter Jackson’s trilogy of the same name debuted, 24 years before Jackson’s Lord of the Rings trilogy first debuted, and one year ahead of Ralph Bakshi’s animated critically acclaimed Lord of the Ring, there was Rankin/Bass’s The Hobbit.

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