Agent Palmer

Of all things Geek. I am…

Spoiler Free Review

Hard Soft and Wet by Melanie McGrath

Hunting Down the Future in 1997: A Review of Hard, Soft and Wet by Melanie McGrath

Melanie McGrath’s Hard, Soft and Wet: Digital Generation Comes of Age is a memoir of sorts where she is hunting “down the future, starting with the everyday intimations of tomorrow — the games, gadgets, and consumer fads — that were already an invisible part of so many young lives and I would work my way up to the networks, which will, in their turn, become a mundane part of the lives of those children’s children, and perhaps also of my own children.”

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In Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Spy by Len Deighton

In Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Spy, Antony joins the ranks of Palmer, Armstrong, and Charles.

From the dry desert of the African Sahara to the wet fields of Ireland, the crisp winters of New York City and Washington D.C. to the humidity of Miami, Len Deighton’s Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Spy is a global jaunt following the implications and repercussions of a defected Russian scientist named Bekuv, his wife, Major Mann, Red Bancroft, and our lead Frederick L. Antony.

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Avengers Infinity War Spoiler Free Review Ten Years of Marvel

#ThanosDemandsYourSilence and the MCU Demands Your Respect with Avengers: Infinity War (No Spoilers)

Ignoring the plot (because “Thanos Demands Your Silence” and I, for one, do not intend to stand against Thanos), Avengers: Infinity War could be a bit jarring as it jumps between clusters of heroes almost at will, just like comics books tend to do during large crossover events. Of the entire Marvel Cinematic Universe that has been building towards this singular point in time, this is perhaps the most faithful adaptation of panel to screen, despite borrowing plotlines from several…

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Generation X Tales for an Accerated Culture by Douglas Coupland

Appreciating Coupland’s Generation X Takes Time, Life Experience

I have a confession to make. When I took my first crack at Douglas Coupland’s Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture, I didn’t get very far.

It was a suggested read from a friend, so I bought it. I read 35 pages and then, for some reason, never finished the book. Fast forward to this year: I read Microserfs, also by Douglas Coupland, and ended up falling in love with his writing style.

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