Agent Palmer

Of all things Geek. I am…

Love for Jurassic Park Series is Anything but Extinct, 30 Years Later

Love for Jurassic Park Series is Anything but Extinct

Until I became a self-sufficient consumer, there was only one movie I had ever watched on opening weekend. In fact, until I could buy my own tickets, it was the first film I’d seen within the first few weeks of release: Jurassic Park.

It was wet. It might have been raining when we arrived or at some point during the film or earlier in the day, but that’s how I remember it. What I know for sure is that I was 10 years old and going to the drive-in with my parents to see Jurassic Park on the big screen. That kind of memory sticks with you.

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Brooklyn Beauties Focus of Margo Donohue’s Love Letter Film Study

How proud are you of your home’s impact on film? Are you so proud of your city address that you’d write a book about your city and all the things that were filmed there?

Author Margo Donohue has done just that with her beloved Brooklyn. This isn’t just a list of movies, although it has that, too. It’s a history of film in Brooklyn which is not only rich in industry history, it’s basically the start of it all.

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Somehow, A Pepsi Court Case Provides Refreshing Documentary Fodder

“Pepsi, Where’s My Jet?” isn’t just a small documentary series on Netflix about one ad campaign. This is a nostalgia fest of 90s culture, a deeper look into the Cola Wars, and a showcase of documentary-making about a court case.

In 1995, Pepsi launched their “Pepsi Stuff” campaign. At the end of the launch commercial, it displayed on screen that for 7 million Pepsi points, you could get a Harrier Jet. John Leonard took that seriously, and what happens from there is documented in this series.

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A back-from-the-dead defense of 2013’s R.I.P.D.

R.I.P.D. is the perfect comic book movie. I know it got panned, but trust me when I tell you that a lot of that is circumstantial.

People generally prefer to complain rather than just sit back and enjoy something. If you can believe it, that’s more prevalent now than it was in 2013 when this was released, but it was still true then.

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Suellen Hoy Has All the Dirt on the American Pursuit of Cleanliness

Chasing Dirt The American Pursuit of Cleanliness

Are we as clean today as our parents were? As our grandparents? What about our great grandparents? Probably not. Are we healthier? I don’t know.

I can answer the first questions, though, because I just finished reading Suellen Hoy’s Chasing Dirt, which “is about us as a people, a people who developed and nurtured over a century and a half a love affair with cleanliness. This book is, in fact, the first general history of cleanliness in the United States.”

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