Agent Palmer

Of all things Geek. I am…

Ahsoka & Most Wanted: Agent Hunt Reviews Star Wars Teen Literature…

Ahsoka & Most Wanted: Mike Reviews Star Wars Teen Literature

…is a sentence I never thought I’d type. But I’m trying to read as much of the new canon content as possible, and Ahsoka, by E.K. Johnston had reviewed well. That led to Rae Carson’s Most Wanted, but more about that later.

Ahsoka, surprisingly enough, focuses on Ahsoka Tano and sets about filling in the gaps between Clones Wars and (slight spoiler warning) Rebels. With Ahsoka on the lam from the Empire, the story follows the former Jedi padawan as she attempts to build a new life for herself.

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The Dip is a Short and Important Book About Quitting by Seth Godin

The Dip: A Little Book That Teaches You When to Quit (and When to Stick) by Seth Godin

At the time of the drafting of this post, The Dip: A Little Book That Teaches You When to Quit (and When to Stick) by Seth Godin has 632 customer reviews on Amazon with an average rating of 4.2 out of 5 stars.

That’s pretty impressive for telling people that quitting can be beneficial. But he’s so correct that much of the book is “so obvious we’ve overlooked it.”

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Deconstructing Sammy is about more than the Resurrection of the Legacy of Sammy Davis, Jr.

Deconstructing Sammy by Matt Birkbeck

Deconstructing Sammy: Music, Money, and Madness by Matt Birkbeck could very well be one of the saddest books I have read in recent memory, which includes some books on WWII.

There are a lot of things in play in this book… “Adored by millions, Sammy Davis Jr. was considered an entertainment icon and a national treasure. But despite lifetime earnings that topped $50 million, Sammy died in 1990 near bankruptcy.

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“Of a Fire on the Moon” by Norman Mailer is the Poetry and Prose of Apollo 11

Of a Fire on the Moon by Norman Mailer

There is something unique about Of a Fire on the Moon by Norman Mailer. Is it that it’s immensely rich with poetry in prose telling one of the great triumphs of modern engineering? Is it that Mailer looks for the lurking evil of the Moon or that he’s not sure if the moon shot itself was the work of the devil?

Could it be the dark humour, the deciphering of the three men who undertook the journey and those organizations and people who helped get them there? Or the curious platitudes on science versus engineering?

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