Agent Palmer

Of all things Geek. I am…

How To Make A Difference: A review of Alan Jennings’ The Pursuit of Fairness

The Pursuit of Fairness Alan Jennings

This book is three things in one. It’s an activist’s manifesto describing the thoughts and some of the actions that Alan Jennings has had that have cultivated his activist’s mentality; it is a memoir describing his assault on problems within his own community that has fed his activism; and it is a how-to manual for running, creating, and even just working for or volunteering at a non-profit organization.

All three of those things is what makes The Pursuit of Fairness: Fighting for What’s Right in a World That’s So Wrong by Alan Jennings a heavy and yet still entertaining book to read and learn from.

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Deconstructing Sammy is about more than the Resurrection of the Legacy of Sammy Davis, Jr.

Deconstructing Sammy by Matt Birkbeck

Deconstructing Sammy: Music, Money, and Madness by Matt Birkbeck could very well be one of the saddest books I have read in recent memory, which includes some books on WWII.

There are a lot of things in play in this book… “Adored by millions, Sammy Davis Jr. was considered an entertainment icon and a national treasure. But despite lifetime earnings that topped $50 million, Sammy died in 1990 near bankruptcy.

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For Your Favorite Indie Podcast: Remain Indie or Go Mainstream

For Your Favorite Indie Podcast Remain Indie or Go Mainstream

A while ago I asked a Twitter Poll question “Your favorite indie #podcast can either remain indie and more or less remain as it is or go mainstream and potentially be vastly different… You want it to Remain indie or Go mainstream?”

That the results were so close, with 51% saying they would want their favorite podcast to “Go mainstream” is extremely surprising… Or is it?

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Innovation Meets Invention: A Review of The Innovators by Walter Isaacson

The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution by Walter Isaacson Book Review

I always take notes when I read a book. Part of it comes from wanting the ability to add quotes to the reviews I write, but the bigger picture reason is because sometimes I like to go back to those notes and see them at a later date. By actually being able to read through a small document with all the quotes I pulled, I’ll find the one I remember, and it’s easier than paging through and rereading a whole page.

I bring this up because the notes I collected from reading The Innovators by Walter Isaacson are more than a lot of the other books I have recently read, even some on the same subject.

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